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Blancanieves

✭ ✭ ✭ ✭   Read critic reviews

Spain, Belgium, France
·
2012

Rated PG-13 · 1h 44m

Director Pablo Berger
Starring Maribel Verdú, Macarena García, Daniel Giménez Cacho, Ángela Molina
Genre Drama, Fantasy
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Despite being released in 2012, Blancanieves is a black and white silent film that the director has called "a love letter to European silent cinema". Based on the 1812 fairytale of Snow White, this adaptation, set in 1920s Seville centers on a female bullfighter called Carmen Villalta

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WHAT ARE CRITICS SAYING?

50

Slant Magazine by

Pablo Berger digs for emotional intensity in his gothic retelling of Snow White and only uncovers layers of gloss.
70

The New York Times by A.O. Scott

It communicates the delights of pastiche rather than the thrill of original creation, a secondhand movie love that is seductive but not entirely satisfying.
75

NPR by Ella Taylor

Brimming over with sadism and the occasional touch of kink, Blancanieves piles on the pathology that's the birthright of any fairy tale worth its salt. Yet it's still a tale of lost innocence, and Berger keeps faith with a prototype revered by the Disneys and the Grimms alike: the resilient, enterprising girl who overcomes wave after wave of adversity.
83

IndieWire by Eric Kohn

If nothing else, Blancanieves offers an excellent case for revisiting the early days of cinema -- and for recognizing how much has been lost in its absence. While "The Artist" recalled the silent film industry, Blancanieves solely pays tribute to the art.
80

Time Out by Joshua Rothkopf

Expressively (Berger knows his grammar), a white communion dress is dipped in black dye as her custodial grandmother passes away and an evil castle beckons.
83

The A.V. Club by Noel Murray

Berger also shows a dark wit and a faith in old-fashioned melodrama that puts Blancanieves more in the camp of Pedro Almodóvar than Guy Maddin’s golden-age pastiches. (And aside from being silent and a period piece, the movie has almost nothing in common with "The Artist.")