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Tremors(Temblores)

✭ ✭ ✭ ✭   Read critic reviews

Guatemala, France, Luxembourg
·
2019

1h 47m

Director Jayro Bustamante
Starring Juan Pablo Olyslager, María Telón, Diane Bathen, Mauricio Armas

Genre Drama

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Pablo, an evangelical father, has it all-- a lucrative job, a stunning wife, two beautiful children. But Pablo's world is shaken when his deeply religious community discovers that he is in love with another man. With his family torn apart, Pablo must now navigate the conflicts between his faith and his identity.

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WHAT ARE CRITICS SAYING?

50

The New York Times by

Bustamante renders the film’s distinct milieus with extraordinary texture. The sanitized and soulless spaces of Pablo and his family form an evocative contrast with the lively, bustling bars and streets frequented by Francisco. But this emphasis on sensory detail comes at the cost of the big picture.
80

Screen Daily by Allan Hunter

Jayro Bustamante offers a thoughtful, emotionally-charged exploration of a devoutly religious family man torn apart by the revelation of his love for another man.
100

TheWrap by Carlos Aguilar

It’s a magnificently unflinching film from a master director in the making, whose thunderous strength will surely make waves in Bustamante’s Central American homeland and abroad.
91

IndieWire by David Ehrlich

There are any number of movies about gay men trying to liberate themselves from the long shadow of heteronormative oppression — a regrettably, enduringly relevant premise — but few have been told with the extraordinary nuance or compassion of Jayro Bustamante’s Tremors.
80

Variety by Guy Lodge

This strong second feature from Guatemalan talent Jayro Bustamante doesn’t ask new questions, but its sensuous, reverberating atmospherics find fresh, angry ways to answer them.
70

The Hollywood Reporter by Neil Young

Bustamante's screenplay is a philosophically and theologically nuanced affair, intermittently elliptical, concentrating on the bigger picture without bothering to sketch in the smaller details. This becomes something of an issue, given that these are often the pivots upon which the somewhat telenovela-like plot hinges.