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The Artist and the Model(El artista y la modelo)

✭ ✭ ✭   Read critic reviews

Spain, France
·
2012

Rated R · 1h 44m

Director Fernando Trueba
Starring Jean Rochefort, Aida Folch, Claudia Cardinale, Götz Otto
Genre Drama
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In France during World War II, Marc Cros, an aging sculptor struggling with his art, finds new inspiration when he takes in a young woman named Merce, a Spanish refugee who he decides will be his next model, in this black-and-white film looking at the nature of art and creativity.

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WHAT ARE CRITICS SAYING?

50

NPR by

The Artist and the Model suffers from the opposite affliction: It has all the trappings of a serious work of art, and it hasn't been hurried but it remains, in the end, disappointingly hollow.
60

Time Out by Eric Hynes

While veteran director Fernando Trueba (Belle Epoque) and writer Jean-Claude Carrière don’t bring much novelty to the May-December/muse-artist/naked-clothed cliché, they do imbue the material with genuine feeling—exploring the melancholy of waning days and a defiantly naive belief in artistic transcendence.
67

The A.V. Club by Mike D'Angelo

A wholly fictional tale, and while it has a few lovely, tender moments, there’s a definite feeling of “been there, drawn that.”
30

The New York Times by Miriam Bale

It is a film with nothing but delight — no major revelations, no gravity and no meaning. This superficiality is a problem only because of the pretense of being about great art.
50

Slant Magazine by Nick McCarthy

This safe, solemn tale of an aged artist whose vitality is briefly revived by a pretty young thing is unconvincing as an articulation of the potentially spiritual nature of the artist/model relationship.
50

The Dissolve by Tasha Robinson

It’s a modest, reserved character piece that doesn’t push an agenda. The problem is that it comes across as if it lacks opinions, rather than holding them back.
30

Village Voice by Zachary Wigon

Treating one's audience like ignorant children in need of lecturing is hardly a way to win fans, or display one's own artistry.