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Sunset Song

✭ ✭ ✭ ✭   Read critic reviews

United Kingdom, Luxembourg
·
2015

Rated PG-13 · 2h 15m

Director Terence Davies
Starring Peter Mullan, Agyness Deyn, Kevin Guthrie, Hugh Ross

Genre Drama

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The daughter of a Scottish farmer comes of age in the early 1900s.

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WHAT ARE CRITICS SAYING?

60

CineVue by Ben Nicholson

While there is hardship and anguish, Davies' deliberate and treatment of the source material ultimately lessens the dramatic impact even while it retains its splendour.
70

The Hollywood Reporter by Deborah Young

It is a rare director who dares to embrace the slow, meditative rhythms of a classic novel without feeling the need to modernize or accelerate it, but Davies uses the measured pace to unfold his poetic vision of the Scottish peasantry and their attachment to the land.
80

Empire by Ian Freer

Deyn is a revelation in a difficult but rewarding take on Scottish rural life. The most English of directors has done a Scottish classic proud.
63

Slant Magazine by James Lattimer

Terence Davies's sheer talent for creating sensuous images conveniently masks how little of this feeling actually emerges from the plot these images illustrate.
91

The Playlist by Nikola Grozdanovic

With his monumental control of the camera —at times staying with characters during quiet moments of anticipation, at others panning slowly 360 degrees to envelop us in the entirety of the environment— Davies directs the most refined coming-of-age story cinema has seen in recent years.
50

Variety by Peter Debruge

In full anamorphic 65mm splendor, the resulting landscapes are lovely, as is the face of relative newcomer Agyness Deyn in the role of hardy Scottish heroine Chris Guthrie, although the underlying feelings are all but lost, rendered in a difficult-to-fathom Scottish dialect and withheld by Davies’ overly genteel directorial approach.
60

The Telegraph by Tim Robey

There are gorgeous things about it, there’s one really good performance, and reminders of Davies’ transcendent style ripple through the film. But it also feels broken and cumbersome, weighed down by a number of decisions that simply don’t work.

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