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Decoding Annie Parker

Based on the true story of Annie Parker, a breast cancer patient who lost her mother and sister to the same disease and her experiences working with Mary-Claire King, a renowned scientist who discovers the hidden link between genetics and cancer.
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WHAT ARE CRITICS SAYING?

60

Los Angeles Times by Betsy Sharkey

The division between the personal and scientific stories is not a clean one. It gives the film an uneven rhythm as it at times lurches between the two women's very separate lives.
70

Arizona Republic by Bill Goodykoontz

Morton is outstanding. The rest of the cast, which includes Rashida Jones and Bradley Whitford, is also good. Bernstein does a nice job moderating the tone of the film, which could have been depressing, but isn't.
20

The Dissolve by David Ehrlich

Cross-cutting the story of a cancer victim who’s struggling to maintain her agency with the story of the woman who’s trying to cure her should compellingly enhance both threads, but Bernstein refuses to take advantage of his film’s structure and draw meaningful connections between the two.
42

The A.V. Club by Ignatiy Vishnevetsky

As hackneyed as the movie’s portrayal of Parker’s life might be, it seems subtly shaded in comparison to the King narrative, which mostly consists of people in lab coats saying things aloud that they should already know, using easy-to-follow metaphors while pointing to a conveniently posted chart or diagram.
50

Washington Post by Jen Chaney

Decoding Annie Parker could have shown much more effectively and deeply that the fight against an often ruthless disease can be won by women attacking it from multiple sides. Instead, it sticks mostly to one track, taking audience members on a journey that, sadly, via the movies or their own lives, they already may know a little too well.
63

Slant Magazine by Jordan Osterer

This isn't a film of bedside conversions or radical emotional transformations, nor is it a story about laughing at one's own hardships as a coping mechanism.
75

McClatchy-Tribune News Service by Roger Moore

The film tells Annie Parker’s story with heart and wit, and finds a few funny insights into the stubborn, brusque woman, Dr. Mary-Claire King, whose lonely quest to find proof would bear fruit.

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