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Beasts of the Southern Wild

Six-year-old Hushpuppy lives with her father, Wink, in 'the Bathtub', a southern Delta community at the edge of the world. When Wink contracts a mysterious illness, nature reacts—temperatures rise and the ice caps melt, unleashing prehistoric creatures called aurochs. It's up to Hushpuppy to search for her lost mother.
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WHAT ARE PEOPLE SAYING?

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WHAT ARE CRITICS SAYING?

100

Variety by

A stunning debut that finds its dandelion-haired heroine fighting rising tides and fantastic creatures in a mythic battle against modernity.
88

Slant Magazine by Ed Gonzalez

Benh Zeitlin's lived-in, almost abstract sense of social realism is partly what makes the film so refreshing and uniquely affecting.
83

IndieWire by Eric Kohn

If nothing else, this memorable effort eloquently displays Hushpuppy's fragile understanding of her world, where the only certainty is that nothing lasts forever. That makes "Beasts" into a gigantic triumph even when it falls apart.
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ReelViews by James Berardinelli

The problem with Beasts of the Southern Wild is that, like "The Tree of Life," it seeks to integrate its small, very personal story into a much larger, more ambitious tapestry.
60

Time Out by Joshua Rothkopf

How can a movie so steeped in post-Katrina imagery eschew even the smallest comment about social responsibility? Maybe that was deemed too earnest, a decision that makes zero sense when a twinkling score is ladled on like instant pathos. Real people aren't beasts, nor do they require starry-eyed glorification. Bring your liberal pity.
91

The A.V. Club by Noel Murray

It's undoubtedly something extraordinary: like a live-action Miyazaki film, with Days Of Heaven narration, set in a dirt-poor community at an unspecified time of crisis.
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Boxoffice Magazine by Ray Greene

Seek this one out though, because it's too unique and too defiantly strange to survive for long in today's Darwinian and consumerist exhibition environment.
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Time by Richard Corliss

Mark down the date: June 27. That's when American moviegoers will see this perfect storm of a film, and the tiny force of nature that is Quvenzhané Wallis.
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The Hollywood Reporter by Todd McCarthy

It's very much an art piece, to be sure, but it feels like a genuine one that, while meditated, speaks fluently and truly for the place, people and culture it so indelibly depicts.

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