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Our Time Will Come(明月幾時有)

In the 1940s, school teacher Fang Lan becomes involved with the resistance efforts of local guerrilla group Dongjiang during the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong. Things are looking up until Fang's mother volunteers to take Fang's place as a courier for a mission and is arrested. To save her mother, Fang finds herself turning to a childhood sweetheart, who now works at the Japanese occupation headquarters.
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WHAT ARE CRITICS SAYING?

83

The Film Stage by

Our Time Will Come sets itself in often-neglected, Japan-occupied Hong Kong, and offers a unique perspective on the war most commonly portrayed in film.
90

The New York Times by Andy Webster

It’s Fang’s transformation, embodied by Ms. Zhou’s lean, cool authority, that carries the most weight, lending the proceedings an unforced feminist dimension, and reaffirming Ms. Hui’s status as one of China’s cinematic treasures.
80

The Hollywood Reporter by Clarence Tsui

Beyond the handful of obligatory escapades, gunfights and images of martyrdom, the film reveals itself as less a drama about extraordinary heroes than an illustration of life in a fallen city.
80

Screen International by Fionnuala Halligan

While the running time can weigh heavily on some of the sub-plots, the overall effect is as strong as Hui intended and the title underlines the bitter irony of the history involved.
70

Variety by Maggie Lee

By highlighting the value of artists and intellectuals, and the importance of protecting them, [Hui] imbues the authentic historical episode with timely universal relevance.
80

Los Angeles Times by Michael Rechtshaffen

Those accustomed to the sort of grandly executed, tightly paced escape/rescue sequences that tend to go with the territory will have to acclimate themselves to the film’s more subdued rhythms, but in time, the quietly unassuming, character-rich approach pays some affecting dividends.
100

RogerEbert.com by Simon Abrams

The characters in this film are defined by motives that are small enough to be relatable, and actions that are big enough to be inspiring.

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